Transparent Leadership

Blog Post by
Rev. Dr. Craig M. Howard
Presbytery Leader
choward@glpby.org


So deeply do we care for you that we are determined to share with you not only the gospel of God but also our own selves, because you have become very dear to us. I Thessalonians 2:8

At the upcoming presbytery gathering on February 7th at Southminster, I will be installed as Presbytery Leader of Giddings-Lovejoy. I have served as your transitional presbytery leader and will now become permanent. The option to move from interim to permanent was part of my original contract. I would like to share with you some personal thoughts of what this new relationship means to me.

Being installed is a very personal and emotional event. It means entering into a covenant relationship with the presbytery. I have a strong internal sense of call to institutional ministry. It is the same call I experienced while serving at McCormick Seminary and the Presbytery of Milwaukee. At these places I was able to serve a broader theological, racial and geographic area than most local congregations encompass. I have also served as pastor of Presbyterian congregations as well. Serving in a congregation allows me to express love and care for members as I live with them through the challenges of life. It is the same love and care I feel for each congregation in Giddings-Lovejoy, without exception. I rejoice in the good news I hear when a congregation reaches a goal or has a wonderful accomplishment. My heart breaks when a congregation is in conflict, suffers a tragedy, or has to end its ministry.

I have found relationships to be the key. Being installed means being interconnected with the members of Giddings-Lovejoy and the communities they serve. It is about building, nurturing, and strengthening relationships.

I am blessed to have family and friends that I love deeply. Unfortunately, most of them live a good distance away from me. We stay in touch through calls, texts and email. But even then, sometimes I get busy and communication runs dry. I have found relationships take work, and communication runs both ways. I have as much responsibility to reach out as they have to contact me.

Interconnection is also a two-way street. As your installed Presbytery Leader, I am called to reach out and build connections. Simultaneously, the members of Giddings-Lovejoy must be willing to reach out and connect by communicating with me, volunteering and participating in presbytery events.

In this way I can get to know you. I can come to understand your values, your joys and your worries. Likewise, I am committed to being transparent and opening myself to you. This is not easy, and I am not perfect at it. As an African American male, being hidden and emotionally elusive is a survival instinct. My sense of call, vocation, covenant, and baptism call me in a different direction than my upbringing. I am called to love and be transparent. Love without transparency is a noisy gong and clanging cymbal.

Thank you for saying yes to God’s call and allowing me to serve as your Presbytery Leader.

Rev. Craig M. Howard

A Caring Church

Blog Post by
Rev. Dr. Craig M. Howard
Presbytery Leader
choward@glpby.org


The installation service of Rev. Alexandra (Alex) Lysdahl at First United, Bellville, was joyful, lighthearted, reverent, and delightful. When Rob Dyer, the head of staff, gave the charge to Alex, he began by using scripture in a humorous way. But his jovial mood became serious as he reflected on seeing Alex administer care to someone in the hospital. Rob observed the gentleness and loving spirit Alex demonstrated in the hospital room. He felt that if his mother were ill, he would want someone like Alex providing pastoral care.

Relationships are the lifeblood of a congregation. We build connections with one another over time. These connections, which are often generational, are one of the reasons we enjoy coming together in worship, teaching, and mission. Being present for one another during the difficult times of life is the core of what it means to be together. We need one another. This is even more true when we are hurt, afraid, or grieving. We need people who are trained to walk alongside us during times of grief, suffering, and loss. In the book All Our Losses All Our Griefs, Kenneth Mitchell and Herbert Anderson write, “Although grieving is by its very nature a lonely task, the resolution of grief requires the presence of other persons.”

At our next presbytery gathering on Thursday, February 7th at 1 p.m. at Southminster Presbyterian in Crestwood (note the change in location), training will be offered in pastoral care. The training is designed for deacons, but ruling elders, pastors, and other congregational leaders are invited to attend. Rev. Renita Mercado-Heinzl will lead the workshop. Renita serves as chaplain at St. Luke’s Episcopal Presbyterian Hospital. She brings a wealth of experience, gifts, and wisdom to this ministry.

There are many options for learning at this presbytery gathering. Although the workshop descriptions mention particular groups or congregation size, you are encouraged to self-select and attend the workshop that best fits the needs of your congregation. The intention is not to be constraining but to offer flexibility through choice. Please register, attend, and plan to listen and share as we learn together. The registration page can be found here.

Rev. Craig M. Howard

Learning Together

Blog Post by
Rev. Dr. Craig M. Howard
Presbytery Leader
choward@glpby.org 


In the 1990s there was a series of commercials featuring the Shell Answer Man. These commercials talked about ways to save gasoline and how to keep a car maintained. The Shell Answer Man was portrayed as the expert who had the answer to any question regarding automobiles. Today, automobiles are more complex and so is motor oil! In fact, as electric vehicles (EV), plug in hybrids, and solar powered cars enter the market, motor oil may become a memory.

Congregations have also turned to experts for guidance. In the book, Leadership Without Easy Answers, Ronald Heifetz writes, “In times of distress we turn to authority. To the breaking point, we place our hopes and frustration upon those whose presumed knowledge, wisdom, and skill show the promise of fulfillment. Authorities serve as repositories for our worries and aspirations, holding them, if they can, in exchange for the powers we give them.”

Authoritative experts serve us well when we are dealing with technical problems. These are problems we can both define and solve. This is the diagnosis of an infection that needs an antibiotic. But often in congregations, the problem is not technical but adaptive. Adaptive problems cannot easily be defined, and if they can be defined, there is no clear solution. When we are faced with adaptive problems, the solution requires learning and changing our behavior.

So then, how do we learn? I believe we learn together, in community. We learn by listening to one another. We learn by listening to those who are in the same situation and struggling with the same issues. We learn by having holy conversations of discernment based on scripture, prayer, confession, and commitment to change.

At our February 7th Presbytery Gathering at New Horizons in Overland MO at 1 p.m., we will have three concurrent workshops that will focus on congregational ministry. The workshops are based on the number of worshipers (not members) in a congregation. The idea is to have people with similar issues and challenges to meet in a space where they can share thoughts and ideas under the guidance of a professional facilitator from Ministry Architects. The workshops will be geared for pastors, but all congregational leaders are welcome to attend.

Congregational ministry doesn’t have a Shell Answer Man. What it does have is the Holy Spirit who is present as we listen and speak and as we open our hearts to God’s direction for our lives and our congregations.

Rev. Craig M. Howard

The Need for Strong Sessions of Discernment

Blog Post by
Rev. Dr. Craig M. Howard
Presbytery Leader
choward@glpby.org


I began my ministry in the Presbyterian church as a ruling elder on session responsible for worship and music. Things were going along fine until the musician resigned. In my former church, which was Pentecostal, the pastor would step in and find another musician. In fact, the musician could not be hired without the pastor’s approval! But I was in a new church world now! The session expected me to lead the search for a musician. This meant creating a job description, understanding the pay rates, advertising, interviewing, and making the hire. I kept waiting for the pastor to step in and take over or tell me what to do. Instead he just encouraged and supported me and showed great confidence in my ability. The hire went well, and I learned the value and responsibility of being a ruling elder.

Then, for some reason the pastor decided not to do the prayers of the people anymore. He had that section removed from the bulletin. I’m not sure why. Perhaps he was going through his own night of the soul and found it hard to pray. This became a crisis and the church asked the session to determine if the pastor had the authority to make that decision without the session (the answer is no. The pastor and session are responsible for worship, which includes prayer W-2.0302, W-5.0202). I had to approach the pastor and have the difficult conversation. Afterward, prayer was reinstated in the bulletin.

I lift up these two stories because they taught me that a church is only as strong as its session and the ruling elders who serve on it. Paul Hooker, a leading polity expert argues that ruling elders are called to the ministry of discernment and governance, with an emphasis on discernment. This means ruling elders seek the will of Christ, “Not the shrewdest business decision. Not the action that comports with my pre-established preferences. Not the decision that places me on the right side of political favor (or the pastor). We are called to discern — to separate out all that stuff — until all that is left is the one that reflects the will of Christ. . .  The role of a ruling elder is a spiritual function.”

This is why we are offering Ruling Elder Training at the February presbytery gathering. I believe our churches are only as strong as our sessions. We need ruling elders who are gifted and empowered to serve along with the pastor in the work and ministry of the congregation. I’m encouraging and inviting all ruling elders who serve on sessions to be a part of this learning and training. Let’s share stories, insights, and learn how to discern the will of Christ together.

Rev. Craig M. Howard

Gathering to Learn

Blog Post by
Rev. Dr. Craig M. Howard
Presbytery Leader
choward@glpby.org


Happy New Year! Allow me to start the year with a blessing. May we live in the light of God’s grace and the love of Jesus Christ, who forgives all of our sins. May the tender mercies of God remind us that in our weakness we are made strong through Christ. May we live in fellowship with one another characterized by the peace that surpasses all understanding. May this peace of Christ be extended to all humanity, nature, and the world.

The February 7th Presbytery Gathering will meet at New Horizons Presbyterian Church from 12:45 to 5:00 and will be a time of education, worship, and business, and you are invited to attend! Today, I want to share with you the content of the education portion of the gathering.

The theme of this gathering is Ministry in the 21st Century. The focus is on church officer training. The educational portion is scheduled to begin at 3:00 and will be a two-hour session. There will be six concurrent sessions to choose from.

Session One- Treasurers

This session will be led by the accounting firm of Clifton, Larson, Allen (CLA). This is the accounting firm that handles the presbytery’s finances. They will discuss fiduciary duty, developing an investment policy for churches (including socially responsible investing), budgeting, and financial reporting. I’m encouraging all treasurers and finance committee members to attend and participate. If you cannot attend, we will make sure the handout is available for you to receive.

Session Two- Ruling Elder Training and Session Three- Deacon Training

Ruling elder and deacon training will cover broad categories of call, responsibility, and how to serve on a session (ruling elders). Deacons will focus on providing pastoral care. This training is for new ruling elders and deacons, as well as those who want to brush up. All deacons and ruling elders are invited to attend these sessions.

Session Four- Congregational Visioning

There will be three sessions for pastors and congregational leaders who are seeking ideas and plans for 2019. Session Four is for congregations with 150 or more in worship. This session will focus on leveraging resources for ministry, visioning, and strategic planning.

Session Five- Congregational Enrichment

Session Five is for congregations with 150 or less in membership but are stuck and need a gentle push. These churches will get a needed boost in their ministry.

Session Six- Congregational Rejuvenation

Session Six is for congregations of 150 or less and are trending downward and are seeking rejuvenation. These congregations have seen a downward slide in worship attendance and energy and are trying to regain a foothold.

The consulting firm of Ministry Architects will lead the three sessions. I am excited about what we will learn, and how we will apply our learning this year.

I know this is a lot, so I will make sure we repeat the information and send it to you in various forms. For now, be sure to put the date and time on your calendar. It will be a worthwhile educational opportunity.

Rev. Craig M. Howard