Follow Your passion!

Blog Post by
Rev. Vanessa Hawkins
Designated Associate Presbytery Leader
vhawkins@glpby.org


This past Saturday, the Rev. Jimmie Hawkins, Director of the Office of Public Witness, posed two question to approximately 70 Giddings-Lovejoy members. What is your passion?  What are your concerns? The Office of Public Witness is the public policy information and advocacy office of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).  Jimmie is the director and also my brother.

The Social Witness Action Team (comprised of social witness team members from across the Synod of Mid-America presbyteries) hosted the Troubling the Waters: For the Healing of the World event. It was a wonderful and relaxing event filled with relevant information, dynamic music, discussions, a nice lunch and fellowship. There were Giddings-Lovejoy members who came from the North and South and East and West in Missouri to learn more about the Office of Public Witness (OPW) and local issues. 

For over 45 minutes, Jimmie gave an overview of the work of his office and reminded us that “people are looking for the presence of the church outside the doors of the church.” He also reminded participants that our Presbyterian forefather John Calvin wrote, “Civil magistery is a calling not only holy and legitimate, but by far the most sacred and honorable in human life… Therefore, we are called to be engaged in the public arena, and ask how God is calling me to act out my faith in the world.” 

What I truly enjoyed about this event was that the Social Witness team provided presenters who embodied a national focus as well as those focusing on local issues. Jimmie discussed national issues (i.e.; sex trafficking, racial injustice, gun violence, and the opioid epidemic, etc.) while the six panelists from local Presbyterian churches and community organizations highlighted their passion and concerns for educational and health equity, community and church relations, elder care, racial justice, payday lending, and the benefits of providing access to community gardens. Each individual presented participants with a wealth of information and resources.

What I loved about this event was that Giddings-Lovejoy folks showed up. The diversity of the participants (age, faith community, race, geography) demonstrated that Presbyterians across this presbytery care deeply about justice. In fact, so deeply that they gave up their Saturday to be a part of this event. Also, people in our communities are passionate not only about engaging social justice issues, but they continue to learn other ways to be a presence of hope and mercy in and for the world. My hope is that this event not only provided new information, but also opened the doors to new friendships and partnerships.

Below are a few links to some of the resources that were mentioned.

Peace,

Rev. Vanessa Hawkins

Resources:

  1. Social Witness Office (PCUSA): https://www.presbyterianmission.org/ministries/compassion-peace-justice/acswp/topics/
  2. Office of Public Witness: https://www.presbyterianmission.org/ministries/compassion-peace-justice/washington/
  3. Booklet: Holy Discontent:  Grassroots Advocacy and Organizing in the PC(USA): https://www.presbyterianmission.org/resource/holy-discontentment-advocacy-resource/

Gloria

Blog Post by
Rev. Dr. Craig M. Howard
Presbytery Leader
choward@glpby.org


Before the St. Louis Blues played the Boston Bruins in the Stanley Cup finals, I’d watched the Bruins decimated one hot team after another in the Eastern Division playoffs. Brilliant skaters and passers, Boston was the fastest team on ice. They were barreling toward what I thought to be a potential four game sweep of the upstart Blues from the Western Division. To my glorious surprise, the Blues showed resilience, physical strength, and timely stops that would eventually overwhelm the favorite Bruins.

The St. Louis Blues demonstrated that the team with the best talent, most speed, and accurate shooters doesn’t always win in hockey. But playing as a team wins every time! Teamwork characteristics such as encouraging one another, looking out for teammates’ blind spots, stepping up when the pressure is on, not putting one another down when things go wrong but building one another up, moving forward even after a bad game, and unselfish play are a winning combination.

What does teamwork look like in our presbytery? In what ways can we support one another, encourage and lift up one another? One example is ways in which our small town and rural congregations can feel supported by other congregations in the presbytery. For example, on July 28th Boeuff Presbyterian in Gerald will be celebrating its 160th year anniversary. What would it mean if a dozen people showed up from other congregations? Such an appearance would help Boeuff know they are not alone out in Gerald. Old Argo celebrates a Sausage Supper weekend on Saturday October 12th. Wouldn’t it be great if a number of folks from around the presbytery showed up to help them celebrate and raise money for the congregation?

Physically supporting one another is just one way to show teamwork. Another way is by sharing ideas which stretch the congregation’s cultural comfort zone. Tomorrow is Juneteenth, a Missouri holiday that celebrates the liberation of slaves. Why not use Juneteenth liturgies in congregations that do not have African American members?  What an educational moment this could become! I’ve included a couple of liturgies in this newsletter.

So, what else is going on in your church that the entire presbytery could experience? What are some other ways you can imagine us working together as a team? Now if I can just get that darn song out of my head!! Gloria! Gloria!

Rev. Craig M. Howard

Innovators and Laggards

Blog Post by
Rev. Dr. Craig M. Howard
Presbytery Leader
choward@glpby.org


In 1962 Everett Rogers wondered why people grab hold of certain new ideas while others reject the same idea. He wrote the book, Diffusion of Innovations, which describe how new information spreads. Those who latch on early are called innovators, while those who tend to wait until the end are called laggards. I was first introduced to this theory while studying to be a presbytery executive in a presbytery leadership cohort. The faculty warned us that we might think something is a solid idea, but don’t be surprised if the presbytery warms up to it gently and slowly.

I received a letter last week with a great idea that I want to share. My hope is that you too will see the value, opportunity, and challenge which the letter presents. It is a summation of a survey. In 2018 and 2019, Luther Seminary conducted visits to over 58 congregations and several Lutheran synods. They then compiled a list of seven key themes which church leaders should know. Thanks to Mike Willock who sent me a copy of the letter. The themes are-

  • Deepen Christian identity and practice
  • Cultivate Christian community
  • Innovate faithfully
  • Connect with diverse neighbors
  • Equip the saints for ministry
  • Shift ministry models
  • Improve administrative leadership

Each of these points could take an article! I believe the list is accurate for the congregations in our presbytery as well as for the presbytery itself. As you look at this list, how is each of these items encouraged, nurtured, and utilized in your church? Which of these items are supported by the presbytery through its structure, mission, grants, and ministry? Where are we lacking? Is there something missing from the list you would add?

Wouldn’t it be great if those who are interested in each point could talk with one another and share ideas and ways to do the work? I’d love to make that happen! The more innovators and early adapters we have of these seven points, the more robust and healthier our presbytery will become. Let me now if you’re interested!

Rev. Craig M. Howard

Organic Systems

Blog Post by
Rev. Dr. Craig M. Howard
Presbytery Leader
choward@glpby.org


As many of you know, one of the ways I relax is by going to a movie each week. Friday is my off day (and I try and take it as often as possible). This is when I try and attend a matinee. There is something relaxing about being in the dark theater, focused on the film. All of my electronics are silenced. For two hours I am not responsible to anyone or for anything. My mind escapes into whatever world I am viewing. I allow my emotions to flow with laughter, tears, and sometimes fear! At the end of the film I exit refreshed and ready to complete my sabbath with minimal interruption and work activity.

I saw an excellent film last week entitled, The Biggest Little Farm. This documentary is about a couple who decides to start an organic farm outside of Portland, OR. The film illustrates how everything can work together in a balanced and healthy ecosystem. As a system, when one thing gets out of balance or ignored, it affects other things in ways we often cannot imagine.

This month has activities for pastors, church leaders, social justice advocates, and those in specialized ministries. Later this year we will address honorably retired pastors, as we build cohorts for new pastors, transitional pastors, and pastors of color. Most of these events happen when various ministers, leaders, and members come together on their own initiative, and then invite the presbytery to join them.

The key to making our ecosystem work is knowing that healthy ministry springs up organically. I’ve learned that pushing programs down from the top often doesn’t work. The presbytery does its best work when people come together with a dream. Then, by utilizing the abundant resources of ideas, mission, and vision, they create the soil that is needed. The presbytery can then be invited to sprinkle its resources of technology, leadership, institutional connections, and finances. From this mix of resources, seeds of ministry sprout, and the entire presbytery is blessed! This is when we do our best work!

If you want more information on these activities, please contact Janice McMillen at jmcmillen@glpby.org.            

Blessings,

Craig M. Howard

Boundary Training June 5 St. Mark Presbyterian
All Teaching elders and Pastors are required to take boundary training once every five years.
     
Healthy Pastors/Healthy Congregations June 7/8 Glendale Presbyterian
Presented by the Board of Pensions. Each pastor and leadership team learn strategies for pastor and congregational health. The church then earns a grant to reduce pastoral debt or add to retirement savings.
     
Troubling the Waters: For the Healing of the World June 22 John Knox Presbyterian
An exciting program from the Synod, featuring the Rev. Jimmie Hawkins, Director of the Office of Public Witness, Washington D.C. This event will address social justice in Giddings-Lovejoy and beyond. 
     
Taste of Tuscany June 26 St. Luke Hospital Atrium
A fabulous dinner for those in specialized ministry, hosted by St. Luke Hospital.

 

 

 

 

A Taste of Tuscany                             June 26            St. Luke Hospital

(A fabulous dinner for those in

Specialized ministry,

hosted by St. Luke’s hospital.)