Hiding in Plain Sight

Blog post by
Rev. Dr. Craig M. Howard
Presbytery of Giddings-Lovejoy
Transitional Leader
choward@glpby.org


Earlier this year, I purged the files in my office as part of our move. As I began to go through the hundreds of folders, binders, and files, I was amazed at the good and thorough work the volunteers and staff of the presbytery had done. In many cases, I was able to trace back the origins of a decision or policy, which we now take for granted. I found answers to many questions and used some of the documents to begin plotting a course for the future of the presbytery.

I am not challenging you to go through all of your stuff (although purging old books and papers is not a bad idea)! However, I learned that there are so many questions we have already answered. The answers are often hidden in plain sight, and they can be found if we would just take the time to stop and read.

In a recent Vision Team meeting, concern was raised about the clergy misconduct that has come to light in the Catholic Church in Pennsylvania. During our discussion, we discovered an excellent Sexual Misconduct Policy on our website. The policy was put together by our own members, and it was hiding in plain sight! I encourage every congregation to access and download the policy here.

Our website is loaded with resources to help our sessions, congregations, and ministry teams. It all comes down to a commitment to search out and read what is already produced. This means taking the time to download the papers for the presbytery gathering on your computer, tablet, or phone, and then reading them; highlighting questions; and talking with team leaders at presbytery about questions you would like clarity on. On Thursday, we will not have candidates read their statement of faith publicly, since the statements are in the papers. This provides more time for questions and affirmations.

Perhaps this can be our new norm: a commitment to read what is sent to us in order to prepare for our meetings and time together. We can also commit to scanning the website for answers and reading the policies that already exist. I know the process is imperfect. You may struggle to find something, find something that is badly written, or not find something where you think it should be. When this happens, talk to us. Let Janice or Leigh know when things are not working as they should. They can be reached by calling (314) 772-2395, by emailing jmcmillen@glpby.org or lporter@glpby.org. Let’s work together to have an informed and knowledgeable presbytery!

Rev. Craig M. Howard

Why Commissioned Pastors

Blog post by
Rev. Dr. Craig M. Howard
Presbytery of Giddings-Lovejoy
Transitional Leader
choward@glpby.org


At our next Presbytery Gathering on August 23rd at First Edwardsville, we will be examining two commissioned pastors (CP). Commissioned pastors are formerly known as commissioned ruling elders-(CRE). Our presbytery currently has 14 commissioned pastors serving 13 congregations. The average size congregation being served by a commissioned pastor is 41. Often, the commissioned pastor is the only choice a congregation has for pastoral leadership. As the membership size of a congregation decreases, so does the capacity to afford called and installed pastors. Decreasing congregations are on the increase. The overall presbytery picture shows an increase in the number of congregations with 50 members or less.

The Presbytery of Giddings Lovejoy has taken an aggressive and intelligent action to create the best commissioned pastors possible. Rev. Stephanie Knopf and Deborah Tracy have led the design of a two-year program to train ruling elders who want to become commissioned pastors. The program will include course work on bible, pastoral care, reformed traditions, and reformed theology. It will also include work as an intern. The program is designed for ruling elders who work at a job other than ministry. Therefore, the courses are available on weekends and online. At the end of the program, the ruling elder will be commissioned to a particular congregation or ministry, after examination by the presbytery. There are currently 11 ruling elders admitted to the commissioned pastors training program.

The two ruling elders coming before the presbytery, Alonzo Williams and Richard Hadley each have the M.Div. For a variety of reasons, they are not pursuing ordination in the traditional Minister of Word and Sacrament track. Alonzo serves as pastor of Beria in St. Louis, and Richard serves as a chaplain in Crystal City. They will be available in the sanctuary at noon to meet and greet people who want to learn more about their history and story. The actual examination will only focus on their statement of faith.

The goal of the meet and greet, and examination, is for the presbytery to get to know those commissioned pastors serving in ministry context that are unfamiliar or distant. It is a way for us to be a connectional church as we get to know all of those serving in the presbytery. I look forward to seeing you August 23rd as we continue to risk and experiment with ways to do ministry in the 21st Century.

Rev. Craig M. Howard

Missional Church Primmer

Blog post by
Rev. Dr. Craig M. Howard
Presbytery of Giddings-Lovejoy
Transitional Leader
choward@glpby.org


I am excited about the keynote speaker and worship leader at our upcoming presbytery gathering. Dr. Bonnie Sue Lewis is the Professor of Mission and World Christianity at Dubuque Seminary. She is speaking to us about being a missional church. I thought it would be a good idea to do a short blog on what missional church means, and why we are learning about it in Giddings-Lovejoy.

Missional church means believing that God is active and involved in the world, and our job as church is to find out what God is doing and join God. This does not mean that God is not present in the local church. Missional church is just another way to do church. Alan J. Roxburgh an M. Scott Boren explain missional church in their book, Introducing the Missional Church. They define our current model of church as the Attractional Model. They write:

“The assumption of the attractional imagination is that average people outside the church are looking for a church and know they should belong to one, and therefore, church leaders should create the most attractive attractional church possible. The mission, then, is to get people to attend.”

I believe our congregations function in the attractional model. We try to make our churches welcoming, and our programing inviting. We have contemporary worship, PowerPoint, and jazz bands. And there is nothing wrong with any of these. Missional church is not a criticism of the attractional model. Unfortunately, the attractional model only works in 20% of our congregations. These congregations are growing. The other 80% of our congregations using the attractional model are somewhere between staying even and a drastic, unsustainable reduction in membership. Since the attractional model isn’t working for the majority of our congregations, the missional church is another possible idea.

Roxburgh and Boren explain missional church this way:

 “God is at work in the world to redeem creation, and God invites us to participate in this mission. . . This imagination turns most of our church practices on their head. It invites us to turn toward our neighborhoods and communities, listening first to what is happening among people and learning to ask different question about what God is up to in the neighborhood. . . What are the ways we need to change in order to engage the people in our community who no longer consider church a part of their lives?”

Come out and learn about missional church. I invite you to participate in the neighborhood canvas as well and begin looking for what God is doing in our neighborhoods.

Rev. Craig M. Howard

Leave the Building

Blog post by
Rev. Dr. Craig M. Howard
Presbytery of Giddings-Lovejoy
Transitional Leader
choward@glpby.org


When I was executive presbyter in Milwaukee, there was one city whose economy was based on the GM auto plant. During the great recession, the plant closed. This resulted in increased unemployment and under employment. Downtown became a ghost town as stores closed and shops boarded up. The downtown Presbyterian church took a hit too. Membership dropped along with collections. It was a matter of time before the church could no longer afford a full-time pastor.

I fret and worry about congregations in cities and towns where industry is drying up. I am concerned when I visit a church and the people inside of the building look very different than the people walking around on the outside of the church. James Taylor wrote a song about a struggling small town. The song, Letter in the Mail says, “Little by little, light after light, that’s how it died.” And “The church bell still rings on Sunday, old folks still go, the young ones listen on the radio.”

However, I noticed that even in the areas where industry has dried up, there are still thousands of people. These people are finding new ways to live and thrive in the community. They may commute further to a different job that pays less. They may not be able to buy as much as they used to, but they are still there. What does that mean for childcare, food, and social life? What does it mean for the local church?

In the book Holy Conversations, Gil Rendle and Alice Mann believes every congregation should ask three questions: Who are we? Who is our neighbor? What has God called us to do?

To learn “who is our neighbor,” our congregations can get out of the building and walk around the neighborhood to see what is going on. Sometimes our congregations become commuter churches as members move further away when the neighborhood declines. But there’s no substitute for heels on concrete, and taking the time to observe the spaces, homes, and buildings of the community. We can sit in a room and guess about the needs and identity of our neighbors, but until we get out and meet them we do not know who they are.

At the August 23 presbytery gathering, we are going to leave the building and go into the community of Edwardsville to conduct a Neighborhood Exegesis. This is a walking survey that is part of the Vital Congregations Toolkit, available here, developed by our denomination. They write, “The goal is to get to know more about the neighborhood and its people. We do this by using all 5 senses. We are not going out to teach anything, to convert anyone, or to change the neighborhood, just to learn from the people who know more about it that we do.”

Wow! My hope is that we will learn about Edwardsville, but also return to our congregations and conduct a Neighborhood Exegesis in our community. The future church is a community connected church. Our neighborhood shapes our community and congregation. Let’s leave the building and learn who they are.

Registration for the Pre-Session and Gathering is now open and can be found here.

Rev. Craig M. Howard

The Necessity of Disconnecting

Blog post by
Rev. Dr. Craig M. Howard
Presbytery of Giddings-Lovejoy
Transitional Leader
choward@glpby.org


It’s been a long time since Marilyn and I have taken a vacation together. Somewhere between getting kids through college, living apart for two years with very demanding jobs, beginning new work for each of us in 2017, life hasn’t allowed the rhythm for us to just get away together. This year we planned a nice Alaskan land and sea cruise. We spent the past 10 days enjoying scenic Alaska. This included seeing bears, wolves, moose, caribou, whales, and eagles. These were against a landscape of mountains, glaciers, oceans, rivers, and trees. The sea cruise portion was a time to be pampered, served, and simply have fun.

We also took this time to disconnect from our electronic gadgets. No internet, texting, email, or phone calls. I found this to be difficult at first, but then it became another source of relaxation.

I learned a lot by going off the electronic grid. First, my life is filled with noise. I am bombarded by information, whether I ask for it or not. Many times, I go on the internet to look something up. When I open my browser, I am hit with so many stories and advertisements, I often forget what I went on the internet for! I’m to the point of having to first write down what I’m looking for, before browsing (Am I the only one having this problem!). And the news is like hearing one blaring scream after another. It’s as though the only thing that matters is what makes me worry, afraid, or angry.

I also learned that it is important that the office can function in the short term without me (or any particular employee). The presbytery office must be able to do the work of the presbytery for a brief time without my input, suggestions, or direction. The same principle applies to our congregations, chaplaincies, counseling centers, or other areas in which ministers work. They must be able to function for a short period of time without the key employee. We all like feeling important. But it is unhealthy to have a system designed around the work of one person. By occasionally withdrawing from the system, we are able to see how others need to step up, and what areas need to change or be supported.

I’m fully plugged back in now. I am returning to work with a spirit of gratitude for the opportunity to serve as your Transitional Presbytery Leader. I am looking forward to a future of great adventures in the life of our presbytery.

Rev. Craig M. Howard

Great Job!

Blog Post by
Rev. Dr. Craig M. Howard
Presbytery of Giddings-Lovejoy Transitional Leader
choward@glpby.org

I’m still receiving thank-you notes. Some are in the form of cards. Some are by email. Others come in envelopes. These are words of thanks and appreciation to Giddings-Lovejoy for hosting General Assembly. The notes are a reminder of the generosity and kindness in the hearts of Presbyterians. The many acts of kindness are directed toward the entire presbytery. We did it, and we did it together!

This issue of the newsletter is focused on the events of General Assembly. Sometimes we forget to stop and inhale after expending a great amount of effort and energy. Sometimes we forget to celebrate a job well done. I have spent the past week meeting with presbytery staff and COLA staff debriefing the event. The debriefing was done with memories, meals, and music. We listened to testimonies, stories, and marveled at the flexibility of all involved. Giddings-Lovejoy showed the entire denomination what hospitality looks like.

Enjoy the photos and videos in this edition of the newsletter, found here. It is all about you. It is all about us. I pray we can ride the energy and connectionism created from our time together at GA into the future of the presbytery.

Rev. Craig M. Howard

Our Neighborhood

Rev. Craig M. Howard
Presbytery of Giddings-Lovejoy Transitional Leader
choward@glpby.org


I remember 1968 very well. Dr. King was assassinated in April, and later that year, 50 years ago this month, Robert Kennedy was assassinated. I still remember the newscast that morning as I was preparing for school. In that momentous and devastating year, something else happened—something big that would give us hope for the future: A children’s show, Mr. Rodger’s Neighborhood, aired for the first time on PBS. A recent documentary has been produced about the making of the TV series. Won’t You Be My Neighbor? is a documentary about Fred Rodger and Mr. Rodger’s Neighborhood. Rodgers was an ordained Presbyterian minister who did a children’s show on PBS from 1968 to around 2001.

I went to see the film after GA. Friends, I highly recommend this documentary. I will not telegraph the content of the film. But I will say that I, along with the audience, was greatly moved by Fred Rodgers. He had a focus and mission to create an internal strength in children. His message was simple: You are loved just as you are. What the documentary made obvious is, that the same message Fred Rodgers pushed each week for the children is necessary for adults as well.

I was amazed at the audience’s emotional reaction to this film and message (there were no children in the audience). Mr. Rodger’s Neighborhood was a low budget production with sock puppets and a simple miniature set. There were no pyrotechnics or colorful costumes. Instead, the focus was on the message. It was relevant, gutsy, and a constant reminder of unconditional love.

Fred Rodgers had an unconventional ministry with a consistent message. I believe the church is a place for people to experience God’s love and acceptance. We are living in a time where people could use a gentle reminder that they are special, and we are all God’s children. What a difference such a message could make in our neighborhood called Country, and our neighbors called Citizens.

Rev. Craig M. Howard

Shining at GA

COLA Co-Moderators, Rev. Cedric Portis and Rev. Carol DeVaughan

Rev. Craig M. Howard
Presbytery of Giddings-Lovejoy Transitional Leader
choward@glpby.org


I’m going to need my Thesaurus to find the proper words to describe the job our Committee on Local Arrangements (COLA) is doing at General Assembly. I will need help finding words to thank all of the volunteers who are participating in GA. Let me start with outstanding, and admirable. I have to add fantastic and incredible.

The Friday night Welcome to St. Louis event, which had never been done in the history of GA, was a sensational success. The music, food, and raffle created a spirit of fellowship and family. This was the goal that Carol Devaughn had when she came up with the idea. We believe this will become part of GA going into the future.

Saturday Worship was extraordinary. The theme of water was brilliant. Thank you Susan Niesen. The reading of the scripture was astounding. The choir was angelic. The dance and singing of “Wade in the Water” thrilled the hearts of the worship participants. I have been attending GA since the year 2000. This was one of the best worship services I’ve been a part of.

Allow me to give a shout out to the video! We have a link on the website, but you can view it here. The video helped to put Giddings-Lovejoy in context. It lifted up our diversity, challenges, opportunity, and the way we have come together as a presbytery. Great idea. Great job.

To all of the churches who hosted convention attendees during Sunday morning worship, thank you! The busses arrived back from the congregations with people full of smiles and joy! Thank you all so much!

Did you attend Bible Study? On Monday morning Deborah Krause created the theological template for becoming a 21st century church and presbytery. Tuesday morning Raj Nadella followed her lead on Tuesday morning. Our souls and spirits were fed. Their teaching was a feast in the Holy Spirit!

And then there was the march on Tuesday. Hundreds of Presbyterians marched from the convention center to the Justice Center to bail our kin out of jail! The denomination raised over $47,000 and the presbytery of Giddings-Lovejoy raised over $2,000 through the giving button on the webpage. Erin Counihan had a crazy dream for a public action. Well, this is what God can do with our dreams.

I wish I could name and thank everyone for your work, help, and efforts. I hope to meet and greet all of the volunteers while you are serving at the convention center. I am so proud of you. I am so proud, happy, and humbled to be your presbytery leader. Giddings-Lovejoy has become a shining light of what a presbytery can do when we all work together.

Rev. Craig M. Howard

A Brief GA Reflection and Revelation

Blog Post by
Rev. Cedric Portis
Co-Moderator of the Committee on Local Arrangements (COLA)


The 223 General Assembly is upon us. I’m confident that our preparation and planning will pay off this week as we welcome and host Presbyterians from all over the world.

These past two years I’ve had the privilege of serving as co-moderator of the Committee on Local Arrangements (COLA). As I continued my work as pastor of Third Presbyterian, there were times the work seemed overwhelming. It was then, in the middle of an already overloaded schedule, God gave me a revelation.

This is how it happened.

When I normally plan my day, I come up with a list of what I HAVE to do.  My revelation is very simple. I change HAVE to GET!!!  This may seem insignificant, but it is revelatory for me. This answer to prayer changes my focus and motivation.

I want to share this testimony with you so that we may all realize the gift we have.  As the Presbytery of Giddings Lovejoy, we can look at this week and say collectively we GET the opportunity to interact, impact, and transform the church, as we do the work of GA.

Perhaps this small change in perspective will continue to excite and motivate us this upcoming week. We have asked the PC(USA) to meet us in St. Louis, and now they are arriving by the thousands! I’m looking forward to seeing you there as well.

Rev. Cedric Portis
Pastor, Third Presbyterian Church

GA#223 – 10 Days Away

Blog Post by
Rev. Carol DeVaughan
Co-Moderator of the Committee on Local Arrangements (COLA)


In case you aren’t aware – the General Assembly of PCUSA meets in St. Louis in about 10 days. I really hope this is not news to any of you, because you, as members of the Presbytery of Giddings-Lovejoy are part of the hosts for this gathering. For more than two years those of us who are part of the planning team have been working on the myriad details of our hosting responsibilities.

We have planned for welcoming folks from around the world, at the airport and hotels, and the corridors of the Convention Center. We have planned tours to various points of interest in our region. We have asked local congregations to welcome and feed Assembly attendees at their congregational worship on June 17. We have designed apparel for volunteers to wear, and gifts to be given to visitors. So many people wanted to be part of the choir for the opening worship, we had to start a waiting list. There are new web and Facebook pages; social media entries, a video and other publicity materials. We’ve planned a “hands-on mission” project and area for everyone to feel they are contributing to helping the STL region. So much! So many people already involved! And we still need more volunteers.

Why should you care, or offer your time and talents and treasure to support the meeting of the General Assembly? Well, the short answer is because we are GA. Just as I often said during my year as Presbytery Moderator, “We are the Presbytery.” We Presbyterians are connectional. We believe that through Christ we are all part of one another. And this concept is the theme of this Assembly “Kindom Building.” You and I are “kin;” all God’s children are “kin.” As kin we care about and for one another, especially those for whom life is a struggle, those for whom injustice is a daily fact of life, those who cry out to God and therefore to us for help.

Being part of our larger church is both a privilege and a part of who we already are. So I hope to see all of you during this General Assembly. It is a joy to witness the church at work in such a special way, an opportunity that will not be closer or easier for years to come.

Rev. Carol DeVaughan, HR
Co-Moderator, Committee on Local Arrangements